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The Conservation Symposium 2022

Preliminary Programme as of 10 August 2022

The Conservation Symposium is a platform to facilitate the sharing of ideas and lessons, and for the co-creation of solutions to contemporary conservation issues in Africa. While many presentations showcase the latest science, it is not a traditional science symposium but rather a conservation symposium that evaluates the implications of the science to the practice of nature conservation and strengthens the evidence base for effective conservation interventions. It also serves as a bridge between conservation practitioners, scientists and policymakers, thereby facilitating effective problem-solving.

Current and emerging issues identified by the conservation sector have been tackled through a carefully constructed programme. A number of leading international keynote speakers and African scientists, who are making an impact globally, have been invited to present. In addition to 150 presentations spread over five days, there are several panel discussions intended to contribute to policy direction and development. A broad range of issues has been integrated in a meaningful way, hopefully creating and strengthening connections both within and between disciplines. 

Given the history of the symposium, the content is still predominantly grounded in southern Africa, but the results, lessons and outcomes are relevant to conservation across the continent. We hope, with the advent of virtual or hybrid formats, to increase contributions and participation from across the continent.

The Conservation Symposium 2022 is brought to you through a collaborative partnership and in-kind contributions from a number of conservation and academic organisations, institutions and associations. Thanks to generous financial contributions from Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife, CapeNature and WildTrust, participation as a virtual delegate is free, thereby overcoming barriers to participation by African conservation practitioners. In-person attendance will be ZAR1500 including VAT excluding accommodation, evening meals and functions, and breakfast. The main venue (within 200km of Durban) and the location of the South African hubs will be confirmed shortly.


Preliminary Programme Overview

Monday, 31 Oct 2022
08:30AM - 11:00AM
Plenary Session
Opening Plenary of The Conservation Symposium 2022: Welcome and Inaugural Session
Format : Plenary Session | Keynote Presentations | Moderated Discussion
Welcome - Joe Phadima, Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife (15 min)

Opening Address - MEC for KwaZulu-Natal Department of Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs (12 min)

Plenary Keynote: How should we think about conservation under a changing climate? Key findings on biodiversity and climate change - Emma Archer, University of Pretoria & Guy Midgley, Stellenbosch University (35 min)

Plenary Keynote: What makes community-based wildlife enterprise work? - Joseph Mbaiwa, Okavango Research Institute, University of Botswana (35 min)

Plenary Keynote: Reflecting on the importance of public consultation in the conservation context - a tale of three recent cases - Alexander Paterson, University of Cape Town (20 min)

Panel Discussion (30 min)

11:30AM - 01:00PM
Parallel Session
Session 2: South African Contributions to Global Biodiversity Targets
Format : Parallel Session | Moderated Discussion
Session Chair: TBC (6 min)

Western Cape State of Conservation Report 2021 - Coral Birss, CapeNature (12 min)

Presenting the 2021-2025 draft Western Cape Protected Area Expansion Strategy - Anita Wheeler, CapeNature (12 min)

Do bioregional plans impact conservation? - Karen Steenkamp, Limpopo Department of Economic Development, Environment and Tourism (12 min)

Update on recognising, assessing and reporting "Other Effective area-based Conservation Measures" (OECMs) in the Western Cape, South Africa - Daniel Marnewick, International Union for Conservation of Nature (12 min)

Review of the current South African provincial conservation legislation - Obied Katumba, Endangered Wildlife Trust (12 min)

To be or not to be a protected area: A perverse political threat - Andy Blackmore, Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife (12 min)

Moderated Discussion (12 min)

11:30AM - 01:00PM
Parallel Session
Session 3: African Wildlife Economy Institute Workshop I - Landscape Restoration and Conservation Enabled through Standards for Wildlife Products
Format : Parallel Session | Keynote Presentations | Moderated Discussion | Workshop

This session will explore how voluntary standards and third-party certification schemes can play a central role in enabling and maximizing the performance of sustainable wildlife value chains. Increasing sustainability in value chains is a key aspect of the development of wildlife economies which have the potential to transform, enhance, and maintain African landscapes delivering biodiversity conservation, climate resilience, inclusive economic opportunities, and community well-being. From wildlife production to wildlife harvesting (foraging, fishing, hunting) to wildlife services (tourism, recreation, carbon sequestration), there is a wide range of wildlife enterprises which could benefit from voluntary standards. These standards help to build markets by providing credibility, and transparency through the value chain. They provide assurance to markets – including consumers, investors, and suppliers – of sustainability outcomes. Thus, they enable wildlife economies to scale up by contributing to Sustainable Development Goals across viable and valuable wildlife value chains.

Session Chair: Chanda Mwale, Wildlife Producers Association of Zambia (7 min)

Session Keynote: FairWild, fair hunting: Standards for wildlife enterprise - Deborah Vorhies, African Wildlife Economy Institute, Stellenbosch University (25 min)

The sustainable use doctrine and non-charismatic species - Han Somsen, Tilburg University & Lund University (12 min)

Population structure of Spirostachys africana. A highly exploited species amongst some communities of Limpopo Province, South Africa - Milingoni Peter Tshisikhawe, University of Venda (12 min)

Verifying sustainability in wildlife product value chains – Reinhart Nyandire, African Wildlife Economy Institute, Stellenbosch University & Victor Muposhi, School of Wildlife Conservation, African Leadership University and AWEI Research Fellow (12 min)

Panel Discussion (20 min)

02:00PM - 04:00PM
Parallel Session
Session 4: Special Session - Pollution Remediation and Protecting Biodiversity and Ecological Assets - Opportunities and Challenges within the Legal Framework, Compliance and Enforcement
Format : Parallel Session | Special Session | Keynote Presentations | Moderated Discussion

Despite a world-class body of legislation in South Africa, the fragmentation of environmental governance, and a lack of resources to increase enforcement capacity, pose significant challenges to the effective management of ecosystems, protected areas, and biodiversity. The result is these are increasingly being taken advantage of to facilitate consumptive exploitation of natural resources. This special session aims to build an understanding of the culture of lawlessness towards environmental legislation by presenting: infographics of applicable legislation; case studies demonstrating the effect non-compliance has on natural resources both within South Africa and further afield; and innovative approaches towards rebuilding a culture of lawfulness.

There is a dangerous cocktail between a reduction in law-enforcement capacity, compliance, and literacy of environmental legislation driving an increase in lawlessness in relation to the environmental legislative framework. This framework should be the stronghold of protected areas, remote areas, and areas linking protected areas which play an integrated and critical role in biodiversity conservation for the benefit and enjoyment of current and future generations. However, together with the fragmentation of environmental governance and a lack of resources to increase enforcement capacity, existing enforcement officials face increasing workloads and expanding roles to educate and facilitate community involvement towards compliance, placing further strain on the environmental governance system. These challenges coupled with broader societal discontent and economic issues create a need to develop innovative strategies to improve environmental governance in a way that mediates interactions between society, the economy, and the natural environment.

This session serves to understand these challenges, highlight the vulnerability of and threats to protected, critical biodiversity, and remote areas, and host discussions towards improved environmental governance. The following themes are considered integral:

  • inappropriate use of natural resources;
  • incompatible development and land transformation;
  • poor understanding and implementation of environmental legislation by planning authorities;
  • poor land use planning and impact assessment practices and ethics contributing to poor development decisions;
  • environmental legislation is fragmented across multiple different departments leading to confusion about where authority lies;
  • management of compliance, especially a paucity of effective and independent environmental compliance officers;
  • pliable legal systems which may be taken advantage of, particularly clauses such as National Environmental Management Act Section 24G, or partisan decision making by authorities and politicians, to open these areas up to unsustainable resource use; and
  • length of the process of transgressions, prosecutions, resolutions, etc.

Session Chair: TBC (10 min)

Session Keynote: Chemical pollution and biodiversity integrity - a threat to conservation? - Ndeke Musee, University of Pretoria (35 min)

Hierarchy of control and precautionary principles in pesticide selection and use: Protecting livelihoods and the environment - Debbie Muir, Department of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment (12 min)

Beyond legal compliance: The environmental performance of luxury safari lodges - Reece Alberts, North-West University (12 min)

Applying the theory of planned behaviour to tourism-related waste behaviour in marine protected areas: The Aliwal Shoal case study - Carrigan Harper, North-West University (5 min)

Legislation in action: Application for wetland rehabilitation within the Working for Wetlands programme - Esmeralda Ramburran, Department of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment (12 min)

The identification and implementation of South Africa's Important Plant Areas - Kaveeshe Naicker, South African National Biodiversity Institute (12 min)

Biodiversity crime in the Succulent Karoo hotspots - Zanne Brink, CapeNature (12 min)

Hurdles associated with the public participation process - Cassidy Manthey, Ndlovu de Villiers Attorneys (5 min)

Assessment of sound pressure levels in a water-filled fish tank under laboratory conditions - Saeed Shafiei Sabet, University of Guilan (poster)

Moderated Discussion (15 min)

02:00PM - 04:00PM
Parallel Session
Session 5: Monitoring and Surveillance for Biodiversity Conservation
Format : Parallel Session | Moderated Discussion
Session Chair: TBC (5 min)

CapeNature's Species Prioritization Framework - a monitoring and surveillance decision support tool - Marienne de Villiers, CapeNature (12 min)

Counting the spots. What does it take to implement a provincial leopard (Panthera pardus) monitoring programme? - Brent Coverdale, Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife (12 min)

Kloof frog breeding biology in South Africa - implications for conservation, Lizanne Roxburgh, Endangered Wildlife Trust (12 min)

A comparative study: Amphibian species richness and habitat condition at Widenham Adams Mission Rural, Isipingo, and Froggy Pond Mount Moreland Wetlands - Cherise Acker-Cooper, Endangered Wildlife Trust (12 min)

Conservation and rehabilitation of a freshwater mountain ecosystem: Using a highly sensitive amphibian as a proxy for change - Joshua Weeber, Endangered Wildlife Trust (12 min)

Citizen scientist rediscovering Extinct in The Wild species in South Africa - Sharndre Heuvel, South African National Biodiversity Institute (12 min)

Confirming the quality of reference sites in mountainous streams of the Luvuvhu catchment using a biological indicator - Pfananani Ramulifho, University of Venda (12 min)

Regional ecological risk assessment of water resource use to the wellbeing of fish communities in the Limpopo River Basin, southern Africa - Angelina Kaiser, University of Mpumalanga (12 min)

Moderated Discussion (20 min)

02:00PM - 04:00PM
Parallel Session
Session 6: Conservation Café I - Many Players; One Team: How to Facilitate Convergence Between the Various Role Players in the Environmental Sector?
Format : Parallel Session | Moderated Discussion | Workshop
Tuesday, 01 Nov 2022
08:30AM - 11:00AM
Plenary Session
Session 7: Integrated Water Resource Management for Socio-Ecological Sustainability
Format : Plenary Session | Keynote Presentations | Moderated Discussion
Session Chair: TBC (10 min)

Plenary Keynote: If it's good enough for fish, then it's good enough for you! - Dorothy Nyingi, National Museums of Kenya (25 min)

Plenary Keynote: Social-ecological management results in the sustained recovery of an imperilled salmon population - David Cote, Fisheries and Oceans Canada (25 min)

Plenary Keynote: Contemporary experiences in freshwater ecosystem adaptation in large protected areas with shared transboundary water resources, Eddie Riddell, South African National Parks (35 min)

Mapping freshwater thermal resilience for informing conservation planning and climate change adaptation strategies - Nick Rivers-Moore, Independent (12 min)

River links and sustainable development space - Cate Brown, Southern Waters (12 min)

Moderated Discussion (30 min)

11:30AM - 01:00PM
Parallel Session
Session 8: Special Session - Out of Sight, Out of Mind: The Fish Below the Surface in Freshwater Ecosystems
Format : Parallel Session | Special Session | Moderated Discussion

Freshwater fishes play an important part within freshwater ecosystems, yet often go overlooked when managing water as a resource. Many parts of Africa have active fisheries that support both commercial and subsistence fishers. The need to improve water security and power provision for a growing human population in the region has seen increases in direct anthropogenic impacts on freshwater ecosystems resulting in river fragmentation, alien invasive species introductions, reduced water quality, and altered flow regimes. This session highlights some of the work being done on fish within Africa and hopefully points to a way forward in how we can manage this valuable resource.

Freshwater fishes are increasingly facing pressures induced by human activities. They occur below the surface of the water and generally are out of sight and out of mind to the general public. Further, demands for water security to meet increased water needs and hydro-power to provide energy in poorly developed regions will only add to anthropogenic stressors on freshwater ecosystems. Fish biology and ecology studies are still largely lacking for Africa, with some recent studies making some strides in studying iconic freshwater fish such as African Anguilla and yellowfish. Despite this progress, there are still large knowledge gaps in understanding the movement of fishes, the value of fish to local communities, and fish responses to changes in freshwater ecosystems. In addition to water resource management, African inland fisheries contribute to the local and global economies and rely heavily on the well-being of fish stock. Managing these fisheries is becoming increasingly difficult as fish are faced with a plethora of issues from anthropogenic causes.

Session Chair: TBC (3 min)

Lessons to learn from inland fisheries development in the Free State Province – exploitation potential of fish resources and appropriate fisheries technologies - Leon Barkhuizen, University of the Free State (12 min)

Estimating the fisheries potential of Flag Boshielo Dam, Olifants River, Limpopo River System, South Africa - Sean Marr, University of Limpopo (12 min)

A potential inland fishery or just another water storage facility for the newly constructed Spring Grove Dam, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa? - Matthew Burnett, University of KwaZulu-Natal (5 min)

River fishery; a forgotten but vital component of capture fishery landings - Charles Kihia, Egerton University (12 min)

Importance of anguillid freshwater eels and associated inland fisheries in southern Africa - Mxolisi Nkomo, University of KwaZulu-Natal (5 min)

Occurrence and recruitment patterns of juvenile anguillid eels into the Sabaki Estuary, Kenya - Lena Gitonga, Pwani University (5 min)

Monitoring the efficacy of a lowland instream barrier on the Thukela River and the importance of river connectivity - Bradley van Zyl, University of KwaZulu-Natal (5 min)

The impact of anthropogenic structures on river connectivity in Pietermaritzburg, KwaZulu-Natal - Nolwazi Ngcobo, University of KwaZulu-Natal (5 min)

Evaluating a rescue-rear-release conservation intervention for South Africa's most threatened migratory freshwater fish - Cecilia Cerrilla, University of Cape Town (12 min)

Conservation implications of morphometric and genetic variation of Limpopo shortspine suckermouth catfish (Chiloglanis pretoriae) - Moloko Matlala, Department of Water and Sanitation (5 min)

Moderated Discussion (10 min)

11:30AM - 01:00PM
Parallel Session
Session 9: African Wildlife Economy Institute Workshop II - Developing Community-Based Wildlife Enterprises
Format : Parallel Session | Moderated Discussion | Workshop

Unlocking and diversifying wildlife economies across Africa contributes to biodiversity being recognised, managed, and used as a key asset for economic development. At the local level, wildlife enterprises can create an incentive to conserve by aligning strengthened livelihoods and community well-being, with biodiversity conservation and climate resilience. A focus on building wildlife enterprises at the local level enables communities to take advantage of their knowledge of the local landscape and wild resources and the products that can be generated from these resources. It also enables the communities to take stock of capacities that need to be strengthened as well as to address barriers that may make it challenging to access markets. This session discusses the potential to apply a sustainable livelihoods approach at the local level. A community-based sustainable livelihoods approach to wildlife enterprise development will enable these enterprises to align community-based natural resource management with enhanced local livelihoods and improved community well-being.

Session Chair: Joseph Mbaiwa, Okavango Research Institute, University of Botswana & AWEI Research Fellow (5 min)

Diversifying the wildlife economy - Brian Child, University of Florida & African Wildlife Economy Institute, Stellenbosch University (12 min)

Sustaining livelihoods through reed harvesting - Nqobile Sibiya, Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife (12 min)

The cost and benefit analysis of Dwesa-Cwebe marine protected area on the Wild Coast, South Africa: What role for the state? - Div de Villliers, Eastern Cape Department of Economic Development, Environmental Affairs and Tourism (12 min)

Documenting case studies of protected areas using alternative livelihoods to reduce user pressure and enhance protected area management effectiveness - Nonhle Mngadi, Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife (12 min)

Product development for conservation: The Manuka honey example and how to persuade people to buy stuff they don't need - Michael Musgrave, School of Wildlife Conservation, African Leadership University & AWEI Research Fellow (12 min)

Panel Discussion (25 min)

02:00PM - 04:00PM
Parallel Session
Session 10: Special Session - Freshwater Ecosystem Management
Format : Parallel Session | Special Session | Moderated Discussion

Increasing water scarcity and the consequent demands for better methods to both manage and monitor our freshwater systems is an urgent necessity, now more than ever before. This session looks at some of the broader aspects that need to be considered when managing these systems, as well as some of the proposed mechanisms that could be used to better manage these ecosystems going forward.

Often overlooked in mainstream spatial planning, freshwater ecosystem management is becoming more and more of a mainstream concern as water demand increases, with a corresponding decrease in water availability. Unlike in situ land-use management typically associated with the terrestrial realm, freshwater resource requirements and management objectives need to be considered in the context of the entire river catchment system, often passing between multiple management authorities and servicing a range of land-use needs, all of which have downstream impacts. This session looks at how the field of freshwater ecosystem management is mobilising to identify, monitor and inform spatial planning, such that this scarce resource is managed to the benefit of both man and biodiversity.

Session Chair: TBC (5 min)

Longitudinal species turnover rates are predictable and should guide sampling site locations for South African river surveys to assess aquatic biodiversity - Nick Rivers-Moore, Independent (12 min)

Estimating the potential for natural ecosystem recovery in Palmiet wetlands - Suzanne Grenfell, Stellenbosch University (12 min)

Towards understanding the hydrology and hydrodynamics of the Muzi Swamp - Jason le Roux, Agricultural Research Council (12 min)

Integrated planning, partnerships, and data synthesis – are we moving forward for freshwater ecosystems in South Africa? - Nancy Job, South African National Biodiversity Institute (12 min)

REFRESH: Filling knowledge gaps for freshwater species of South Africa - Albert Chakona, South African Institute for Aquatic Biodiversity (12 min)

The emergence of a systemic, adaptive governance praxis for enhanced resilience to growing water insecurity in transboundary catchments in southern Africa - Sharon Pollard, Association for Water and Rural Development (12 min)

Applying an integrated catchment model for the Crocodile (west) catchment, South Africa - Khathutshelo Joshua Rasifudi, Department of Water and Sanitation (12 min)

Maps and ecosystem accounts for water-related ecological infrastructure in the Greater uMngeni and Berg-Breede catchments - Aimee Ginsburg, South African National Biodiversity Institute (12 min)

Moderated Discussion (20 min)
02:00PM - 04:00PM
Parallel Session
Session 11: People and Parks
Format : Parallel Session | Moderated Discussion
Session Chair: TBC (5 min)

Developing African-centred frameworks for sustainable land use management practices in biodiversity conservation - Putuma Balintulo, Rhodes University (12 min)

Towards a just conservation psychology - Stephanie Klarmann, University of Johannesburg (12 min)

Assessing the impact of Phinda Private Game Reserve on rural livelihoods of the Mnqobokazi Community - Simphiwe Xulu, University of Zululand (12 min)

The contribution of agriculture to the livelihood needs of rural communities surrounding protected areas in South Africa - Sakhile Nsukwini, University of Mpumalanga (12 min)

Investigating the factors influencing the increasing cases of illegal cattle grazing in Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife protected areas in the KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa - Nonhle Mngadi, Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife (12 min)

Secondary vegetation provides a reservoir of non-timber forest products and agroforestry service options for forestry plantation systems in Maputaland, South Africa - Allister Starke, University of Pretoria (12 min)

Feasibility study to determine potential sites for sea cucumber (Holothuria scabra) farming in Zanzibar coastal waters - Masoud Juma Ali, Zanzibar Fisheries and Marine Resource Research Institute (12 min)

Moderated Discussion (30 min)

02:00PM - 04:00PM
Parallel Session
Session 12: Conservation Café II - Screening Tools for Managing Environmental and Social Risk: Challenges and Successes in the Field, and Potential for the Future, including a Case Study of DFFE's Environmental Screening Tool
Format : Parallel Session | Moderated Discussion | Workshop
Wednesday, 02 Nov 2022
08:30AM - 11:00AM
Parallel Session
Session 13: Understanding and Conserving Oceans and Coasts
Format : Parallel Session | Moderated Discussion
Session Chair: TBC (7 min)

Flow dynamics of the Mlalazi Estuary in KwaZulu-Natal Province of South Africa - Lesiba Mmako, Department of Water and Sanitation (12 min)

Physiological and morphological characteristics of ecotypes of Zostera capensis in Knysna Estuarine Bay - Mosihla Frederick Mokumo, Stellenbosch University (12 min)

Nesting sea-turtle conservation in KwaZulu-Natal - Santosh Bachoo, Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife (12 min)

Baited remote underwater video system (BRUVs) survey of chondrichthyan diversity in Sodwana Bay, South Africa - Laylaa Teixeira Sampaio, University of KwaZulu-Natal (12 min)

Do marine protected areas really protect mobile aquatic animals? - Taryn Murray, South African Institute for Aquatic Biodiversity (12 min)

Forecasted anthropogenic pressures on the ocean - Alejandra Vargas-Fonseca, Nelson Mandela University (5 min)

Navigating transdisciplinary waters for solutions to protect both sharks and bathers in KwaZulu-Natal - Shanan Atkins, University of the Witwatersrand (12 min)

Mitigation strategies for reducing bycatches of non-shark megafauna from the KwaZulu-Natal Sharks Board Bather Protection Programme - Kolobe Lucas Mmonwa, KwaZulu-Natal Sharks Board (12 min)

Cumulative impacts of maritime expansion on Endangered seabirds in Algoa Bay, South Africa - Nicky Stander, Southern African Foundation for the Conservation of Coastal Birds (12 min)

Mapping cultural connections with the ocean and coast in area-based ocean management and conservation - Mia Strand, Nelson Mandela University (12 min)

Moderated Discussion (30 min)

08:30AM - 11:00AM
Parallel Session
Session 14: Species, Landscapes and Processes
Format : Parallel Session | Moderated Discussion
Session Chair: TBC (12 min)

Session Keynote: The future of southern African mountains - Ralph Clark, University of the Free State (15 min)

The Endangered Wildlife Trust's no-go map: A tool for identifying the most irreplaceable sites for species conservation in South Africa - Oliver Cowan, Endangered Wildlife Trust (12 min)

Cut-off lows over South Africa: An in-depth review - Nkosinathi Xulu, University of Zululand (12 min)

Structural analysis of how Shepstone Lake was formed, and its influence on hydrogeology: KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa - Digby Gold, CopperLeaf Consulting (12 min)

The Ngazidja island (Grande Comore), a landscape characterised by current natural and anthropic evolutionary processes (Comoros Archipelago) - Andilyat Mohamed, University of Comoros (12 min)

Coastal vegetation of Nampula and Zambézia provinces in northern Mozambique. An overview of an endemic and Endangered Icuria dunesis species and Critically Endangered Warneckea sessilicapa species at Rovuma Endemism Centre - Alice Massingue, Eduardo Mondlane University (12 min)

Perceptions of a local community about the aardvark (Orycteropus afer), a shy nocturnal mammal - Nolutho Makwati, University of Fort Hare (12 min)

Conservation lessons from studying genetic diversity in widespread small mammals - Isa-Rita Russo, Cardiff University (12 min)

Investigating the distribution of the Critically Endangered De Winton's golden mole on the west coast of South Africa using environmental DNA from soil - Samantha Mynhardt, University of Pretoria (12 min)

Developing a multi-species action plan (MsAP) for golden moles - Cobus Theron, Endangered Wildlife Trust (12 min)

Moderated Discussion (30 min)

11:30AM - 01:00PM
Parallel Session
Session 15: African Wildlife Economy Institute Workshop III - Delivering the SDGs through Wildlife Economies at the Landscape Level
Format : Parallel Session | Moderated Discussion | Workshop

Wildlife economies have the potential to transform, enhance, and maintain African landscapes. Further, the sustainable use of wild resources can deliver on a number of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) at the landscape level. By linking the management of marine and terrestrial ecosystems (SDGs 14 and 15) to sustainable production processes (SDG 12), it is possible to also promote inclusive economic growth (SDG 8), climate resilience (SDG 13), zero hunger (SDG 2), gender equity (SDG5), and so on. This session will explore how wildlife economies can deliver SDGs by managing landscapes so that "human beings can enjoy prosperous and fulfilling lives and that economic, social and technological progress occurs in harmony with nature" (2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development).

Session Chair: Michael Musgrave, School of Wildlife Conservation, African Leadership University & AWEI Research Fellow (12 min)

Wildlife economies and sustainable development - Francis Vorhies, African Wildlife Economy Institute, Stellenbosch University (12 min)

Taking stock on the implementation of biodiversity economy: A case of Umfolozi Biodiversity Economy Node (UBEN) - Zoluntu Ngwane, Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife (12 min)

Climate and grasslands - Romain Pirard, Stellenbosch University (12 min)

Justice, equity, and economy at the landscape level - Leslé Jansen, Resource Africa (12 min)

Panel Discussion (30 min)

11:30AM - 01:00PM
Parallel Session
Session 16: Linear Infrastructure: Impacts on Biodiversity
Format : Parallel Session | Keynote Presentations | Moderated Discussion
Session Chair: TBC (5 min)

Session Keynote: Linear infrastructures and biodiversity - Wendy Collinson-Jonker, Endangered Wildlife Trust (20 min)

Impact of linear infrastructure on South Africa's primate fauna: The need for mitigation - Bibi Linden, Lajuma Research Centre, University of Venda (12 min)

The effect of roads on vertebrate mortalities in Hluhluwe-iMfolozi and Isimangaliso Wetland Parks in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa - Cameron Cormac, University of KwaZulu-Natal (12 min)

An inventory of amphibian roadkill in the western Soutpansberg, Limpopo Province, South Africa - Thabo Hlatshwayo, University of KwaZulu-Natal (12 min)

Why did the Albany adder cross the road? Or did it? Methods to detect and mitigate extinction threats to an elusive dwarf adder - Shona Macaffer, University of Edinburgh (12 min)

Moderated Discussion (17 min)

02:00PM - 03:30PM
Parallel Session
Session 17: Understanding Biodiversity in Mixed Land-Use Environments
Format : Parallel Session | Moderated Discussion
Session Chair: TBC (5 min)

Understanding drivers of land use and land cover change in Africa: A review - Eméline Sêssi Pélagie Assede, Université de Parakou & University of Pretoria (12 min)

What we have learned from nearly 10 years of researching bats in macadamia? - Sina Monika Weier, University of Venda (12 min)

The value of biodiversity conservation to the agricultural industry: A case study from South Africa - Nyiko Gift Muteleni, ZZ2 (12 min)

Vulture Safe Zones - an effective tool for landscape-level collaborative vulture conservation - Anel Olivier, Wildlife ACT (5 min)

Cranes and cows: Farmers and conservationists in conflict - Jeremy Ridl, Ridl & co (12 min)

Diversity and functional role of birds in Benin's agroecosystems - Hippolyte Agossou, University of Parakou (12 min)

Can monoculture timber plantations conserve more ant communities than adjacent natural forests? - Thembekile Mthimunye, University of KwaZulu-Natal (5 min)

Moderated Discussion (15 min)

02:00PM - 03:30PM
Parallel Session
Session 18: Spotlight Session - Biological Invasions
Format : Parallel Session | Moderated Discussion
Session Chair: TBC (5 min)

Progress in alien and invasive plant species detection in the Northern Cape, Free State and Eastern Cape provinces, South Africa - Thembelihle Mbele, South African National Biodiversity Institute (12 min)

Invasion risk of naturalised Desmodium species in southern Africa - Mbali Mkhize, South African National Biodiversity Institute (12 min)

The para-ecologist model: A novel approach to tackling emerging invasive alien species in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa - Zethembe Ntombela, South African National Biodiversity Institute (12 min)

Impacts of invasive fish on ghost frog tadpoles - Daniel van Blerk, Stellenbosch University (12 min)

The prevalence of wild boar in South Africa - Claudette James, Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife (12 min)

Moderated Discussion (25 min)

02:00PM - 03:30PM
Parallel Session
Session 19: Conservation Café III - Internet of Things: How is Technology Driving the Way we View and Implement Conservation?
Format : Parallel Session | Moderated Discussion | Workshop
04:00PM - 05:00PM
Plenary Session
Session 20: Canines in Conservation
Format : Plenary Session | Moderated Discussion

This session will screen "Making CONTACT - a K9 Conservation Story". Filmed in Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, Kruger National Park and Cape Point, this five-part mini-series celebrates and profiles anti-poaching K9 units in South Africa's nature reserves and tells the personal stories of five of the dogs and their handlers – the companionship, perseverance and connection between them and the important link with our natural environment. It also raises awareness of the key organisations, protected areas and individuals on the ground that are working together to protect our natural heritage. This will be followed by a brief panel discussion on the growing use of dogs in conservation.

Thursday, 03 Nov 2022
08:30AM - 11:00AM
Plenary Session
Session 21: Global Dialogues: Protecting Biodiversity - A Means to Achieve Goals
Format : Plenary Session | Keynote Presentations | Moderated Discussion
Session Chair: TBC (5 min)

Plenary Keynote: Title TBC - Sue Stolton, Equilibrium Research (35 min)

Moderated Discussion (10 min)

Plenary Keynote: Rights of nature: Legal developments - Christina Voigt, International Union for Conservation of Nature (20 min)

Plenary Keynote: The vital importance of rights of nature and earth jurisprudence to conservation - Cormac Cullinan, Wild Law Institute (20 min)

Plenary Keynote: River persons: Rights in law but no rights to water - Erin O'Donnell, University of Melbourne (20 min)

Plenary Keynote: Megafauna restoration: Big-picture thinking and North-South solidarity in 21st-century biodiversity policy and law - Arie Trouwborst, Tilburg University (20 min)

Moderated Discussion (20 min)

11:30AM - 01:00PM
Parallel Session
Session 22: Special Session - Rights for Nature: Progress in the Protection of Natural Systems
Format : Parallel Session | Special Session | Moderated Discussion

The impact of people on the natural environment through unsustainable use, development, and land transformation is acknowledged as the key threat to biodiversity. Legal frameworks, however, define legal rights and obligations pursuant to achieving specific desirable outcomes. The outcomes and consequences of anthropogenic-driven climate change, global warming, and environmental pollution have exacerbated the demise of biodiversity and natural systems. Our laws and policies, which should reflect our societal urgency to halt the demise, require a new approach to achieve a world which lives in harmony with nature and is backed by governance that ensures sustainability. The Rights of Nature approach is internationally gaining recognition as a viable means. This special session will focus on global and South African perspectives; on the successes and challenges of the Rights of Nature approach to protecting biodiversity, natural systems, and habitats.

Threats, both individually and cumulatively, increasingly undermine the achievement of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (UN-SDGs) and have a significant impact on attaining biodiversity conservation targets such as protected area networks, the Aichi Targets, and carbon emission targets. The UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development underlines the importance of living in harmony with nature – where all living species are protected. Our laws, governance, and policies must reflect this. Implementing the Rights of Nature provides the approach for the protection of biodiversity and natural systems through granting inalienable rights similar to those afforded to humans. Although the provision of Rights of Nature for natural systems, such as rivers, has been applied in several countries, South Africa has not formalised similar provisions.

Rights of Nature legal provisions are in existence in several countries, some at a national level and others at the local or city level. There is growing recognition that to claw back from what is generally termed the Seventh Extinction, as well as ecosystem pollution and catastrophic climate change consequences, legal frameworks need to be backed by laws and governance ensuring adherence. The Rights of Nature approach provides natural systems with inherent rights to exist, flourish, and evolve. The UN's Harmony with Nature drive underpins nature being viewed not as property, but rather where all living species are protected.

This special session aims to provide:

  • A brief overview of the current global initiatives in attaining Rights of Nature;
  • Opportunities and challenges faced by communities, conservators and law-makers with regards to granting these rights;
  • The manner in which laws would regulate the rights in order to defend, protect, and enforce the rights on behalf of nature;
  • An understanding of how successful implementation of Rights of Nature has been for the restoration of damaged and harmed environments;
  • Case studies or examples of implementation of Rights of Nature; and
  • Issues concerning potential conflicts of rights to nature and human rights.

A panel discussion providing insightful dialogue on the effectiveness of the Rights of Nature to conserve and protect the natural environment will follow the presentations.

Session Chair: TBC (10 min)

Beyond sustainable use: Redefining our relationship with nature through harmonious co-existence - Katrina Lehmann-Grube, Wild Law Institute (12 min)

Rights of nature as a living in harmony approach - Antoinette van de Water, University of KwaZulu-Natal (12 min)

The rights of nature and protection of sacred forests in Benin - Appolinaire Oussoiu Lio, Grabe-Benin Ong (12 min)

Rights of nature recognition and implementation in Nigeria - a case study of River Ethiope - Irikefe Dafe, Foundation for Conservation of Nigerian Rivers (12 min)

Panel Discussion including Christina Voigt, International Union for Conservation of Nature, Cormac Cullinan, Wild Law Institute, Erin O'Donnell, University of Melbourne, & Arie Trouwborst, Tilburg University (30 min)

11:30AM - 01:00PM
Parallel Session
Session 23: Special Session - Protected Area Management Effectiveness: Assessment, Standards and Making the Shift towards Socio-Economic and Ecological Outcomes I
Format : Special Session | Keynote Presentations | Moderated Discussion

Protected and conserved areas, which are cornerstones for in situ biodiversity conservation, are increasingly pressured to meet the needs of species, habitats, ecosystems and communities. How well-protected areas are achieving their objectives and protecting values remains a question locally and globally to understand the effectiveness of these areas. Protected area management effectiveness assessment and the ability of assessment tools to measure ecological and social outcomes has been a research topic for several years. Best practice suggests that assessment tools are informed by qualitative and quantitative evidence, while standards for protected areas are a solid foundation for equitable and effective management of outcomes.

Building on the Aichi Target 11, the Post 2020 Global Biodiversity Framework target for protected and conserved areas noticeably shifts towards the quality and contribution of areas to create a nature-positive future. When these areas are established in the right place, are connected, and effectively and equitably managed, they can help mitigate drivers of biodiversity loss. Although able to report effective management, some protected areas may not fulfil their primary function of reducing biodiversity loss. Globally, effectiveness is hard to measure due to various tools applied and limited data. Increasingly, protected areas are expected to preserve the biodiversity they harbour and serve the needs of communities that benefit from them. Effective protected and conserved regions require a balance between nature and communities while practitioners seek efficient ways to measure and report outcomes.

Protected Area Management Effectiveness (PAME) tools such as the Management Effectiveness Tracking Tool (METT) are utilised to report on conservation outcomes and are the subject of several studies. Over time, practitioners may be pulled between global reporting requirements and measuring trends in individual protected areas. Tools like METT serve international reporting purposes; however, how well can protected areas demonstrate conservation outcomes and what role do standards play? The Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) suggests that 'effective management' requires 'adopting appropriate management objectives and governance systems, adequate and appropriate resourcing and timely implementation of appropriate management strategies and processes.' The IUCN Green List Standard for Protected and Conserved Areas aims to provide a measure for 'strengthening conservation outcomes' and 'improving equitable and effective management through a global benchmark comprising the four components of good governance, sound design and planning, effective management and successful conservation outcomes.

Aims of the session:

  • Explore history, approaches and recent developments in assessment tools such as the METT
  • Explore protected area standards and their role in management effectiveness toward conservation outcomes
  • Explore approaches to monitoring for ecological and socio-economic outcomes, and equitable management

We set the scene for sharing, learning, and discussion through a series of plenary and keynote presentations. Our desired outcome is to learn about recent international developments in the fields of management effectiveness, conservation outcomes, and standards to facilitate a crosswalk from policy and best practice to implementation through real-world examples.

Session Chair: TBC (5 min)

Session Keynote: Meaningful indicators of protected and conserved area effectiveness - Heather Bingham, United Nations Environment Programme - World Conservation Monitoring Centre (25 min)

Integrating protected areas management effectiveness evaluation and strategic planning - Arthur Tuda, Western Indian Ocean Marine Science Association (12 min)

Determining the extent to which national park buffer zones are integrated into spatial development frameworks - Dirk Cilliers, North-West University (12 min)

Profiling communities living next to Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife protected areas to foster supportive relationships towards the management of the protected areas - Nonhle Mngadi, Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife (12 min)

Panel Discussion including Sue Stolton & Nigel Dudley, Equilibrium Research (25 min)

02:00PM - 04:00PM
Parallel Session
Session 24: Biodiversity Law - Welfare Rights and Litigation
Format : Parallel Session | Moderated Discussion
Session Chair: TBC (8 min)

Welfare of wild animals and biodiversity conservation: Joining the dots in South African law - Michale Kidd, University of KwaZulu-Natal (12 min)

Biodiversity litigation: Emerging trends - Kate Handley, Biodiversity Law Centre (12 min)

Groundbreaking judgment for the southern African python (Python natalensis) after the National Council of SPCAs instituted charges of animal cruelty - Arno de Klerk, National Council of SPCAs (12 min)

The NSPCA litigated against the captive lion (Panthera leo) industry's bone exports, resulting in a positive impact for wildlife - Priscilla Stiglingh, National Council of SPCAs (12 min)

Culling of elephants and South African law? - Rob Slotow, University of KwaZulu-Natal (12 min)

The unregulated nature of the commercial captive predator industry in South Africa: Insights gained using the PAIA process - Catherine Jakins, Blood Lions NPC (12 min)

The inevitable evolution of conservation law and policy? A critical look at the draft White Paper on the Conservation and Sustainable Use of South Africa's Biodiversity through an animal law lens - Amy Wilson, Animal Law Reform South Africa (12 min)

Moderated Discussion (30 min)
02:00PM - 04:00PM
Parallel Session
Session 25: Special Session - Protected Area Management Effectiveness: Assessment, Standards and Making the Shift towards Socio-Economic and Ecological Outcomes II
Format : Parallel Session | Special Session | Keynote Presentations | Moderated Discussion

Protected and conserved areas, which are cornerstones for in situ biodiversity conservation, are increasingly pressured to meet the needs of species, habitats, ecosystems and communities. How well-protected areas are achieving their objectives and protecting values remains a question locally and globally to understand the effectiveness of these areas. Protected area management effectiveness assessment and the ability of assessment tools to measure ecological and social outcomes has been a research topic for several years. Best practice suggests that assessment tools are informed by qualitative and quantitative evidence, while standards for protected areas are a solid foundation for equitable and effective management of outcomes.

Building on the Aichi Target 11, the Post 2020 Global Biodiversity Framework target for protected and conserved areas noticeably shifts towards the quality and contribution of areas to create a nature-positive future. When these areas are established in the right place, are connected, and effectively and equitably managed, they can help mitigate drivers of biodiversity loss. Although able to report effective management, some protected areas may not fulfil their primary function of reducing biodiversity loss. Globally, effectiveness is hard to measure due to various tools applied and limited data. Increasingly, protected areas are expected to preserve the biodiversity they harbour and serve the needs of communities that benefit from them. Effective protected and conserved regions require a balance between nature and communities while practitioners seek efficient ways to measure and report outcomes.

Protected Area Management Effectiveness (PAME) tools such as the Management Effectiveness Tracking Tool (METT) are utilised to report on conservation outcomes and are the subject of several studies. Over time, practitioners may be pulled between global reporting requirements and measuring trends in individual protected areas. Tools like METT serve international reporting purposes; however, how well can protected areas demonstrate conservation outcomes and what role do standards play? The Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) suggests that 'effective management' requires 'adopting appropriate management objectives and governance systems, adequate and appropriate resourcing and timely implementation of appropriate management strategies and processes.' The IUCN Green List Standard for Protected and Conserved Areas aims to provide a measure for 'strengthening conservation outcomes' and 'improving equitable and effective management through a global benchmark comprising the four components of good governance, sound design and planning, effective management and successful conservation outcomes.

Aims of the session:

  • Explore history, approaches and recent developments in assessment tools such as the METT
  • Explore protected area standards and their role in management effectiveness toward conservation outcomes
  • Explore approaches to monitoring for ecological and socio-economic outcomes, and equitable management

We set the scene for sharing, learning, and discussion through a series of plenary and keynote presentations. Our desired outcome is to learn about recent international developments in the fields of management effectiveness, conservation outcomes, and standards to facilitate a crosswalk from policy and best practice to implementation through real-world examples.

Session Chair: TBC (10 min)

Session Keynote: IUCN Green List of Protected and Conserved Areas - Daniel Marnewick, International Union for Conservation of Nature (20 min)

Title TBC - Nigel Dudley, Equilibrium Research (12 min)

Title TBC - Karl Naude, Department of Forestry, Fisheries and Environment (12 min)

Protected area management effectiveness - resilient decision making for conservation outcomes - Natalie Hayward, CapeNature (12 min)

Identifying key risks to the achievement of protected area system policy objectives - Francois Retief, North-West University (12 min)

Rethinking the relationship between nature reserves and national parks - Andy Blackmore, Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife (12 min)

Moderated Discussion (30 min)

02:00PM - 04:00PM
Parallel Session
Session 26: Conservation Café IV - Funding Proposals: Writing and Construction for Beginners
Format : Parallel Session | Moderated Discussion | Workshop
Friday, 04 Nov 2022
08:30AM - 09:15AM
Plenary Session
Session 27: NEWF Wild Science Media Lab
Format : Plenary Session | Moderated Discussion

NEWF in partnership with The Conservation Symposium brings you the NEWF Wild Science Media Lab. The NEWF Wild Science Media Lab is an immersive, cross-disciplinary science filmmaking workshop that brings scientists together to learn and develop effective tools to communicate their science, nature, and/or conservation work.

For three months, the six successful Fellows will have attended online workshops to develop their storytelling skills. The first six weeks will have been focused on the science of science communication and understanding visual storytelling.

This will have been followed by six weeks of story development; the Fellows will have met with a conservation organisation that will have shared specific conservation work and/or challenges. The Fellows will have developed a story based on the conservation work and/or challenge, pitched it to the conservation organisation, and ensured it is production-ready.

The Fellows will then have participated in a seven-day intensive in-person hands-on filmmaking workshop, producing the story they will have developed. The story will have been filmed and edited in a protected area in South Africa in the week preceding The Conservation Symposium.

The film will be showcased during this plenary session of The Conservation Symposium 2022 with a live panel discussion involving the Fellows, and the final product will also be available to be used by the conservation organisation to promote their work or advocate for their cause.

09:30AM - 11:30AM
Parallel Session
Session 28: Special Session - The Science of Funding: How Conservation Success is Measured by Funding Agencies
Format : Parallel Session | Special Session | Moderated Discussion

One of the key limiting factors to the implementation and sustainability of conservation initiatives is consistent funding. Despite recognising that the global economy is dependent on natural resources and functional ecosystems, environmental degradation continues to grow, placing enormous pressure on the public, private and civil sectors. Globally, parameters for sustainable development and ecological restoration have been established by the United Nations and a joint finance report by the G20 countries, local and global, states that ''to meet all agreed biodiversity, land restoration and climate targets by 2050, the annual nature-based solutions investments need to increase by at least 140%''. This session aims to support the development of a network and forge relationships between conservation finance experts, practitioners and organisations to explore long-term conservation finance solutions to achieve nature conservation outcomes, both locally and globally. Failure to provide adequate climate and biodiversity finance will be measured in the loss of ecological infrastructure and associated goods and services, ultimately threatening social resilience.

Conservation and management of the natural environment require financing at scales sufficient to achieve long-term impact for the benefit of not just current but future generations. Leveraging these funds is often difficult to navigate, painstaking to apply for and, if received, laborious to manage. Thousands of funding agencies and various alternative conservation financing mechanisms are available to support conservation initiatives. However, there is often a disconnect between conservation, funding agencies and financing mechanisms in knowledge and understanding to access these different financial systems to support conservation efforts. Towards addressing this gap, this session provides conservation funding agencies with an opportunity to present their investment projects towards demonstrating the 'Science of Funding' by representing the indicators of conservation financing used to measure conservation success. Followed by a panel discussion to encourage dialogue among the conservation financing industry experts to explore challenges, opportunities and access to the various conservation financing options like carbon credits and biodiversity offsets for example.

Although the main objective of this session is to encourage dialogue and improve knowledge and communication between funders and conservationists, this session also aims to:

  • Form, forge and foster relationships between conservationists and funders.
  • Share stories of change towards determining commonalities.
  • Create learning opportunities to expand conservation financing opportunities and processes.
  • Explore additional funding options that have not yet been leveraged or have not been effectively leveraged.


Session Chair: Augustine Morkel, WWF South Africa (10 min)

The Table Mountain Fund Prosperity Programme - Kerry Maree, The Table Mountain Fund (15 min)

Finance and funding models for conservation - Pria Ghosh, Synchronicity Earth (15 min)

WWF Nedbank Green Trust: It is all in the design of the solution - Augustine Morkel, WWF South Africa (15 min)

SADC TCFA Financing Facility – a financing mechanism for transfrontier conservation areas - Onkemetse Nteta, International Union for Conservation of Nature (15 min)

Funding: The elements enabling access - Shela Patrickson, WWF South Africa (15 min)

Panel Discussion: Conservation financing mechanisms for economically sustainable conservation: Access, application, risks and challenges (35 min)

Moderator: Augustine Morkel, WWF South Africa

Panellists: Candice Eb, South African National Parks, Greg Martindale, Conservation Outcomes NPC, Mark Botha, Independent Environmental Services, Cobus Theron, Endangered Wildlife Trust, & Ian Little, Endangered Wildlife Trust

09:30AM - 11:30AM
Parallel Session
Session 29: Special Session - The Evolution of Crime and The World-Wide-Web: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
Format : Parallel Session | Special Session | Moderated Discussion

The world-wide-web heralded the technological age of enlightenment. Never before was information available at the touch of a button: the entire Encyclopaedia Britannica is available from anywhere in the world; WildEarth.tv allows people to live-stream African wildlife encounters from the comfort of their phones, laptops, tablets, and TVs; social media assists conservation NGOs to generate income through donations to specific causes in seconds; a single tweet can snowball a nudge to a systematic behaviour change; and, cellphone apps turn wildlife enthusiasts' observations into research-grade data. However, much like "the force" there is a dark side to all the good that can come from these technological advances.

This session will focus on the good, the bad and the ugly sides of the internet and social media, and its implications for wildlife conservation. Technologies such as the internet have the means to put people in touch in a way that would never be physically possible. Although much research has been done on the way that the web is used and misused – the impacts on African biodiversity are less known. It is the first session of its kind for The Conservation Symposium. This session aims to pull together researchers, conservationists, NGOs and front-line investigators using cyberspace to influence public perception regarding wildlife conservation, use it as a practical conservation tool, or track perceptions and behaviours. The application of machine learning and social media for monitoring tourist visitation to protected areas and tracking illegal wildlife trade, insights into wildlife traded through internet companies, social media, the exotic pet trade, and subsequent (usually inadvertent) alien introduction, as well as the psychology of web-based wildlife crimes will be focussed on by experts in the field. This session will highlight the importance of the web for conservation efforts, both positive and negative and showcase some of the "tricks of the trade". The main aim is to highlight the growing concern regarding the illicit trade online, speak to means of monitoring activities, and also focus on ways to harness technology for positive change.

Session Chair: Yvette Ehlers Smith, Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife (10 min)

KwaZulu-Natal rhino crime impacts, assessment, and future - Cedric Coetzee, Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife (12 min)

Online trade of alien animal species through social media platforms. Should we be concerned? - Warren Schmidt, Biodiversity & Environment Africa (12 min)

Continuity in the cultural use of carnivores across Africa - Vivienne Williams, University of the Witwatersrand (12 min)

Social media in conservation science: Opportunities, challenges, and going forward - Enrico di Minin, University of Helsinki (12 min)

From patterns to policy: Using insights from social media to understand wildlife trade - Alisa Davies, World Parrot Trust (12 min)

Wildlife trade on the web-supporting conservation efforts of internet companies - Sade Moneron, TRAFFIC (12 min)

Collating biodiversity data for conservation - Dian Spear, South African National Parks (12 min)

Moderated Discussion (25 min)

12:00 Noon - 01:30PM
Parallel Session
Session 30: Invertebrate Conservation
Format : Parallel Session | Moderated Discussion
Session Chair: TBC (5 min)

A field guide to freshwater macro-invertebrates in southern Africa - Christian Fry, The Biodiversity Company (12 min)

Potential effects of climate change on the distribution of Afrotropical Syritta (hoverfly) species - Bonolo Mosime, KwaZulu-Natal Museum (12 min)

Macroinvertebrate diversity and their environmental drivers from temporary habitats of the Maloti-Drakensberg Region, South Africa - Sibusisiwe Moyo, Rhodes University (12 min)

Woody cover and seasonality are the dominant predictors of spider diversity across an elevational transect - Stefan Foord, University of Venda (12 min)

"Come out, come out, wherever you are": Distribution and emergence of the beetle, Ichnestoma dealbata - Marienne de Villiers, CapeNature (12 min)

Moderated Discussion (25 min)

12:00 Noon - 01:30PM
Parallel Session
Session 31: Advances and Novel Techniques in Monitoring and Surveillance
Format : Parallel Session | Moderated Discussion
Session Chair: TBC (5 min)

The living dead: On the trail of a female - Laura Cinti, C-LAB (UK), Quo Artis Foundation (12 min)

The use of microdot technology in cycad conservation - Zwelakhe Zondi, South African National Biodiversity Institute (12 min)

Conservation genetics and management guidelines for two southern African bovid species - Anri van Wyk, University of Pretoria (12 min)

The viability of using horn caps to monitor rhinos - Vanessa Duthe, University of Neuchatel (12 min)

The development of a method for estimating avian indicator abundance with pointing dogs in the Midlands, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa - Stuart Beaumont, Francolin Veldt Conservation (12 min)

Moderated Discussion (25 min)
01:30PM - 02:00PM
Plenary Session
Closing Session: The Conservation Symposium 2022 - Celebrations, Reflections and Awards Ceremony
Format : Plenary Session
03:00PM - 05:00PM
Plenary Session
Post-Symposium Workshop: Biodiversity Offsets I
Format : Plenary Session | Moderated Discussion | Workshop
Workshop Facilitator: Mark Botha, Independent

A very brief introduction to offsets

The what, why, when, how, who and where of offsets

Extracts from the NEMA S24J guideline to highlight current policy direction

Opportunities and constraints, illustrated by examples

Key lessons to improve the use and implementation of offsets

NOTE: Limited to 50 in-person participants and NO virtual participants.


Saturday, 05 Nov 2022
09:00AM - 12:00 Noon
Plenary Session
Post-Symposium Workshop: Biodiversity Offsets II
Format : Plenary Session | Moderated Discussion | Workshop
Workshop Facilitator: Mark Botha, Independent

Opportunities and constraints, illustrated by examples

Key lessons to improve the use and implementation of offsets

NOTE: Only participants who attended Part I can attend Part II


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